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Module 35

The Group of Seven Artists: Inclusions and Exclusions in Canadian Landscape

Alla Myzelev

Canadian Art of the early twentieth century played an important part in demarcating national identity. The Group of Seven artists were especially instrumental in propagating landscape art and presenting it as integral part of Canadianism. The motives that these artists favoured represented Northern nature including uninhabited forests, lakes, and mountains. Through their now famous and much disseminated artwork of Canadian wilderness, Canadian landscape had attracted tourists and contributed to the overall conflation between Canadian identity and natural resources.

Primary sources:

  1. Document: Lawren Harris, The Story of the Group of Seven.
  2. Document: Frederick B. Housser, "The Beginning" in A Canadian Art Movement: the Story of the Group of Seven
  3. Painting: J. E. H. MacDonald, The Wild River, 1919
  4. Painting: Arthur Lismer, A September Gale, Georgian Bay, 1921
  5. Painting: Lawren S. Harris, North Shore, Lake Superior, 1926

Secondary sources:

1. Jessup, Lynda. “The Group of Seven and the Tourist Landscape in Western Canada, or The More Things Change”

Introduction

List of Modules -- 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50