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Module 11

The Métis and Red River Society: Change, Adaptation, and Resistance, 1830s to 1870s

Maureen Lux

Social, economic, and cultural change marked Red River society in the middle decades of the 19th century west. Although newcomers did not bring all the changes that transformed the Metis homeland, new notions of class and race created dangerous divisions in society. The buffalo robe trade drew some Metis entrepreneurs further west, while others stood with Louis Riel in 1870 to protect their homeland and to resist Canadian efforts to remake the west in Ontario’s image.

Primary sources:

  1. Text: My First Buffalo Hunt by Norbert Welsh (1939)
  2. Text: Nova Britannia: or Our New Canadian Dominion Foreshadowed (1884)
  3. Photograph: Métis Couple, Red River, MB (c.1870)
  4. Photograph: Mrs. Nellie Isbister and daughter, Red River, MB (c.1870)
  5. Photograph: Ox and Red River Cart, MB (c.1870)
  6. Photograph: St. Andrew's Anglican Church, Red River, MB (1858)
  7. Photograph: Thomas Scott (c.1870)

Secondary sources:

  1. Sylvia Van Kirk. ‘The Impact of White Women on Fur Trade Society’ in Susan Mann Trofimenkoff and Alison Prentice (eds.), The Neglected Majority: Essays in Canadian Women's History (1977)
  2. Gerhard Ens. ‘Dispossession or Adaptation? Migration and Persistence of the Red River Métis, 1835-1890’ in R. Douglas Francis and Howard Palmer (eds.) The Prairie West: Historical Readings, 2nd edition (1992)
  3. Gerald Friesen. ‘The Métis and the Red River Settlement’ from The Canadian Prairies: A History (1987)

Introduction

List of Modules -- 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50